Penn town planning professor Ken Steif dies at 38

The neighborhood plan Steif hoped to implement in Spruce Hill was delayed by the pandemic, and it finally kicked off the weekend after his funeral under the leadership of his friend and colleague Akira Rodriguez and his former student Sydney Goldstein.

The idea is to engage the community, giving residents the opportunity to learn more about development, urban history and land use policy through short videos and interactive maps. zoning plots. A photographic survey then allows residents to browse the different types of buildings in the neighborhood and decide which ones they want to see preserved.

Rodriguez unveiled the tool at the Clark Park Farmers Market last Saturday. Over 100 people responded to the survey.

“Ken really wanted to help people argue with correct information,” said Rodriguez, professor of city and area planning at the University of Pennsylvania. “He loved when people argued, he loved when they engaged, when they were passionate, when people learned and made better decisions.”

While the model he created can be used throughout the city and outdoors, it should first be used at Spruce Hill. He loved this corner of West Philadelphia, with all of its bustling street life, active porch culture, intellectual and political engagement. Steif moved there in 2000 to date Drexel (although he ended up getting his bachelor’s degree from Temple). He’s hosted block parties, house parties, DJ nights at Elena’s Soul Lounge, long gone, and baseball games.

“He loved his funky music, his spicy food and his neighborhood funky,” Fichman said. “When you’ve lived here for a long time, there really is a serious sense of community that other parts of the city don’t have. At his service, it really felt. He was in the neighborhood and he was a neighborhood guy.

The neighborhood plan Steif hoped to implement in Spruce Hill was delayed by the pandemic, and it finally kicked off the weekend after his funeral under the leadership of his friend and colleague Akira Rodriguez and former student Sydney Goldstein.

The idea is to engage the community, giving residents the opportunity to learn more about development, urban history and land use policy through short videos and interactive maps. zoning plots. A photographic survey then allows residents to browse the different types of buildings in the neighborhood and decide which ones they want to see preserved.

Rodriguez unveiled the tool at the Clark Park Farmers Market last Saturday. Over 100 people responded to the survey.

“Ken really wanted to help people argue with correct information,” said Rodriguez, professor of city and area planning at the University of Pennsylvania. “He loved when people argued, he loved when they engaged, when they were passionate, when people learned and made better decisions.”

While the model he created can be used throughout town and outdoors, it is fitting that it is used in Spruce Hill first. He loved this corner of West Philadelphia, with all of its bustling street life, active porch culture, intellectual and political engagement. Steif moved there in 2000 to date Drexel (although he ended up getting his bachelor’s degree from Temple). He’s hosted block parties, house parties, DJ nights at Elena’s Soul Lounge, long gone, and baseball games.

“He loved his funky music, his spicy food and his neighborhood funky,” Fichman said. “When you’ve lived here for a long time, there really is a serious sense of community that other parts of the city don’t have. At his service, it really felt. He was in the neighborhood and he was a neighborhood guy.

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